The definitive guide to South Asian lingo

TNagarTornado

78 words 0 videos & images

Can speak, read and write seven Indian languages. A Lingo Lingeshwar.

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2011-07-13

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4 1
Phrase. August 5, 2013, Word of the Day
0

Definition

This is a quota of seats in an engineering college that you don't have to go to Kota to get.

The management of the college, at its sole discretion, can give seats to any Sundararajan, Ramanamoorthy or Harvinder it pleases, for whatever reason, under this quota. Usually, the reasons are:

(a) the concerned Sundararajan's father has made a large deposit in a Swiss account belonging to the owner of the college;
(b) the concerned Ramanamoorthy is the son, grandson, nephew, niece, uncle or aunt of the MLA of a far-off constituency; or
(c) Harvinder's father known Ramanamoorthy's father.

Usage

"You're so stupid! Management quota vaa?"
Added 2013-06-25 by TNagarTornado

Root

English

Region

All India

Categories

School and College

Related Terms

Pull
6 0
Verb.
0

Definition

The word "varen" means, "I will come". But it is used to mean the exact opposite, "I will leave."

To go" suggests "to go away for ever to heavenly abode", or "to attain the lotus feet of Rama". So, people say, "Varen", to suggest, when they are taking leave, that they will go now, but they will always come back.

Usage

Example 1:
"Seri da, macha. Varen." (Ok, da, brother-in-law. I will come.)
"Apdiyaa? Nee pore-nu nenachen." (L'that aa? I thought you are going!)
"Hahaha. Orey comedy!"

Example 2:
"Ok, thatha. Naan varen." (Ok, grandfather. I'm coming.)
"Va, va." (Come, come.)

Added 2013-04-06 by TNagarTornado

Root

Tamil

Region

South India

Related Terms

Go and come
7 0
Phrase.
0

Definition

An easy term to put a nervous counterparty at ease in a domestic situation. Your father's friend or your spouse's uncle might use it on you when you go to their house for a meal.

Also used between friends to reaffirm the easy-going nature of their friendship.

Usage

Example 1:

Aunty: You want some more daal?
Billu: No, aunty. I'm good.
Uncle: Arrey Billu, feel free. Eat as much as you want. No formalities.

Example 2:
Billu sits upright on a sofa. Uncle says, "Billu, you can stretch your legs on the coffee table. No formalities. It's your own house."

Example 3:
"Macha, I owe you nine rupees. Will give tomorrow, ok?"
"What, da? Between us what formalities? Freeya vidu."

Added 2013-02-26 by TNagarTornado

Root

English

Region

All India

Definition

In convents and posh public schools, kids were, on a random day of the week, asked to wear a different coloured uniform for strange reasons that revolved around PT class. And on such days, kids were also mandated to wear white canvas shoes. No, no, not the cool Converse variety. In fact, the converse of Converse. Bata canvas shoes. Most perfect for running two rounds of the school ground and then playing disorganised football or kho kho.

Sadly, these shoes were not made to remain white amidst the dusty redness of school playgrounds. The solution was a white viscous solution made by Kiwi that came in a white box with a blue lid. Since you couldn't really 'polish' canvas, you ended up painting your shoes white with this liquid. And Kiwi helped by providing a brush along with the liquid itself.

The funnest activity for a ten year old.

Usage

"Kamala, I have run out of Fair and Lovely. What to do?"
"What ya Vimala, just use Kiwi White Shoe Polish, no?"
Added 2012-12-29 by TNagarTornado

Root

English

Region

All India

Definition

In schools, students are made to stand in ranks and files at one arm distance during PT class. Then, the PT Teacher counts numbers, usually from 1 to 8, and the students, as one, do one of the following - raise their arm(s) forward, backward, upward or downwards; move their legs forward, backward or sidewards; bend their knees slightly while pressing ahead.

Does not look very different from a South Indian cinema dance involving the hero, heroine and a phalanx of background dancers.

Usage

"You know aa? In EA Sports Cricket '97, if you put all the slips near each other and then hit a shot through point, they'll all raise their hands like mass PT!"
Added 2012-12-21 by TNagarTornado

Root

English

Region

All India

share auto

\shaer aato\
5 0
Phrase.
0

Definition

Unstable and unreliable, these ubiquitous vehicles are neither autos nor shared. They are, in construction, metal boxes of irregular and inconsistent shape mounted unsteadily on four wheels. They are, occasionally, three-wheeled. They are larger than autos, and often, smaller than vans. You could say that if an auto is Dr. Bruce Banner, the share auto is The Incredible Hulk. Even their general unruliness, ungainliness and destructive tendencies are comparable.

They operate on fixed routes and rates in Madras on a hop-on-hop-off basis, in the sense that you are only ever allowed the time to hop in or out while the vehicle makes a pretext of stopping.

Sometimes, they have boards on them with the words 'Sher Auto' written in large friendly lettering.

Usage

Harish: Macha, how are you going to college today?
Girish: My father is out of town, da. Car is there.
Harish: Ey, brilliant. I will also come.
Girish: Sorry da. Already five peoples are coming.
Harish: One more you can adjust no?
Girish: I am running a share auto or what to keep stuffing people in?
Added 2012-10-06 by TNagarTornado

Root

English

Region

Madras

Related Terms

auto gap
5 1
Phrase.
0

Definition

Every year, male students of Madras' colleges decide to invoke the spirit of revolution. And they do this by, wait for it, drumroll... storming, vandalising and climbing on top of buses. They dance to Urvasi Urvasi, they eve tease, throw stones at the police, block traffic everywhere, do jalsa, show jilpa. Engage in gujaals and turn into temporary lumpen elements, basically.

Politically, it is organised civil disobedience, backed by the need to make a statement that the people are still all powerful. Sociologically, it is an annual experiment to test mob mentality. Psychologically, it is a manifestation of Freudian sexual frustration. (Much like what was manifested in the lyrics of if you come today.) Biologically, it evidences an excess of underutilised adrenalin and testosterone.

Usage

Bangalorean: Today is Bus Day. We will all encourage public transport and not take our cars to work.
Madrasi: Oye, Late Lateef, old idea, boss.
Added 2012-10-04 by TNagarTornado

Root

Tamil

Region

Chennai

Terms referencing this

Chakka jam
3 0
Noun.
0

Definition

Not a word used to describe hot figures that youths might want to bait. Although it is eminently more usable in that sense.

It is an archaic Indian legal term, derived from the Hindustani 'shebayat', used to describe the trustees of a mutt.

Usage

"Macha, some shebait. 4 o clock!"
"AM or PM?"
"Basket case, check out, da."
He turns around to see two tubby men in orange clothings. "Laude ka baal!"
Added 2012-08-24 by TNagarTornado
6 1
Noun.
0

Definition

When the locative "uth" suffix of Tamil is appended to the English word "time", you are left with an entirely Tamil word "tayath" denoting a curious mix of punctuality and discipline. Most Tamilians don't know it's an English word until fairly late in their lives when they encounter its sister-term "systeth"

Usage

"Tayath-la kulicchu, tayath-la saapdanum."
Added 2012-08-10 by TNagarTornado

Root

Tamil

Region

Tamil Nadu

Terms referencing this

systeth
6 2
Noun.
0

Definition

In the mid 90s in South India, when the height of coolness was still SPB's Hindi songs in Sooraj Barjatya movies, a desktop computer was only called a "system". And the term was so ingrained in the Tamilian psyche that the culture collectively forgot it was an English word, and began appending completely Tamilian suffixes, including the "th" for the accusative case (No, you laude ka baal, it's not a bad word. Be a good student and read your Wren and Martin.).

This led to the delightful term "systeth", so ingrained in the Tamil language that people have started referring to their sisters as "systeth".

Usage

"Enna machi, systeth-a upgradation panniya?" (What sister-in-law, you upgradated the system?)

"Internet varaliya? Modath-a off-on pannu. If that doesn't work (delivered in a slight US accent), systeth-a restart pannu." (Internet isn't working? Switch off the modem and switch it on again. If that doesn't work, restart the system)

Added 2012-08-10 by TNagarTornado

Root

Tamil

Region

Tamil Nadu

Related Terms

tayath